Tribeca 1/1 Cushion - Cushion Covers - Indian Goods Co - 3
Tribeca 1/1 Cushion - Cushion Covers - Indian Goods Co - 3
Tribeca 1/1 Cushion - Cushion Covers - Indian Goods Co - 4
Tribeca 1/1 Cushion - Cushion Covers - Indian Goods Co - 5
Tribeca 1/1 Cushion - Cushion Covers - Indian Goods Co - 6
LEAH SINGH

Tribeca 1/1 wool-embroidered Cushion

0.00€ incl. VAT, shipping extra, non-EU customers save 19%.

  • Hand-embroidered by women artisans in north India, this tiny throw pillow in metallic geometrics is subtle, fun and sophisticated. It is surprising versatile as well, pairing well with light neutrals to add a shimmer and depth, as well with deeper colours to bring a sense of instant glam.

  • 30.5 x 30.5 cm
    100% wool embroidery with rayon accents on a cotton base, with 100% cotton canvas backing
    Dry clean only
    Insert included

Leah Singh
MEET THE DESIGNER: LEAH SINGH

I find my inspiration in all things geometric - from architecture to vintage textiles, floor tiles to industrial machinery.

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We spoke with Leah Singh, the creative genius behind her eponymous label, about what inspired her to start her own label, where her inspiration comes from and what drives her.

Your work is an amazing juxstaposition of texture, technique, colour and pattern. Could you give us an insight into how you got started?
It all started with Kantha, a craft native to West Bengal. A Kantha is a throw made by layering old sarees and then sewing them together with straight running stitches that sometimes incorporate geometric patterns as well. I was introduced to Kantha at a lunch party and I was mesmerized by the colors, patterns, and the embroidery. I wanted to transform this traditional craft into a modern object using colors and patterns that would fit in a contemporary home.

My first Leah Singh collection was Kantha pillows, where I used the traditional embroidery patterns on different fabrics and in a wide range of colors. Kantha lead me to explore other textiles of India to find more possibilities, and soon I was working with women weavers from North East India, weavers from Rajasthan, block printers from Rajasthan, and embroidery artisans from two regions in North India. Each weaving, printing and embroidery technique is unique and native to its region. I take each of these traditional crafts and combine them with contemporary colors and patterns, creating a collection that seamlessly blends old with new.
My color selection process is very fluid - I am either inspired by a grouping of colors which I see somewhere (on a truck, in a fabric store...) or I put together colors by playing around with various combinations. I try and stay aware of my surroundings - you never know where inspiration can come from!
What drives your design aesthetic? How do the traditional artisans you work with react to your ideas?
I’m inspired by geometry, simplicity and color. The artisans I work with have been very open to working on and experimenting with the patterns and colors I send to them, even though at times certain designs are challenging or it is difficult to dye certain colors.

Thank you for your time Leah - we wish you much success ahead!
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